News & Events

Upcoming events for Emerging Markets Institute

December 10, 2019

Fifth Annual Global Strategy and Emerging Markets Conference (GSEM) Theme: Competing in the Digital World

Cornell University Emerging Markets Institute (EMI) and partners — The University of Texas at Dallas Center for Global Business (CGB), Northeastern University Center for Emerging Markets (CEM), and the University of Miami Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) — are pleased to announce the fifth annual Global Strategy and Emerging Markets Conference (GSEM). The the...

December 10, 2019

Fifth Annual Global Strategy and Emerging Markets Conference (GSEM) Theme: Competing in the Digital World

Cornell University Emerging Markets Institute (EMI) and partners — The University of Texas at Dallas Center for Global Business (CGB), Northeastern University Center for Emerging Markets (CEM), and the University of Miami Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) — are pleased to announce the fifth annual Global Strategy and Emerging Markets Conference (GSEM). The the...

December 10, 2019

Fifth Annual Global Strategy and Emerging Markets Conference (GSEM) Theme: Competing in the Digital World

Cornell University Emerging Markets Institute (EMI) and partners — The University of Texas at Dallas Center for Global Business (CGB), Northeastern University Center for Emerging Markets (CEM), and the University of Miami Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) — are pleased to announce the fifth annual Global Strategy and Emerging Markets Conference (GSEM). The the...

Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies Events

April 20, 2020

Apr 20, 2020: “The Politics of Vision: Film, Race and Borderscapes” by Junyoung Veronica Kim, Univeristy of Pittsburg at Stimson Hall

This talk explores ways in which notions of visuality are interconnected with epistemological frameworks of race/ethnicity/nationality and space/territoriality/borders by analyzing Juan Martín Hsu’s film La Salada (2014). By taking as its focus the borderscape of La Salada – the large informal market located in the south of Buenos Aires – that arose from the harsh neoliberal restructurings during the 1990s and the growing waves of migration to the Argentine capital from neighboring countries (e.g., Bolivia), as well as from East Asia (e.g., South Korea), Hsu’s film calls our attention to the intimate connections between the workings of global capitalism, the multiplication of different forms of labor, and the heterogenization of borders. The combining and intersecting of differential geographical scales (the national, the transnational, the local, the global) and the biopolitics of migrant labor (race/gender/sexuality) that the film depicts, complicate not only notions of national territory and identity, but also an understanding of the economic (e.g. neoliberalism, market, finance). Where do we locate and how do we visualize migratory spaces and border zones? How do these spaces suspect dominant narratives of global capitalism and labor? Moreover, how do we understand the relations between biopolitics and geopolitics in the context of global capitalism? Specifically examining the contacts and exchanges between “Asia(ns)” and “Latin America(ns)”–which provide the main narrative technology of Hsu’s film– sheds light on the ways in which human bodies complicate the dominant discourse that reduces “Asia” and “Latin America” to mean national economies.

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April 13, 2020

Apr 13, 2020: "Refracted Empire: The Atlantic Islands and the Early Spanish Caribbean" by David Wheat, Michigan State University at Stimson Hall

Traditional interpretations of Spanish imperial consolidation in the 16th-century Atlantic place heavy emphasis on official maritime structures regulated by authorities based in Seville. But despite their central position in Caribbean historiographies, the Indies fleets and slave trade asientos accommodated multiple agendas -- including some that worked against the priorities of the Spanish crown and House of Trade -- and appear far less monolithic if viewed within a broader context that includes regional traffic, voyages from the Canaries, and commonplace arribadas or "emergency landings." This presentation provides an overview of maritime traffic arriving in selected Caribbean ports, with several illustrative examples of individual travelers and itineraries drawn from notarial records in the Canary Islands. It argues for the utility of viewing early Iberian settlements in the Caribbean and off the coasts of western Africa not merely as way stations or stepping stones for Iberian "expansion," but as polyvalent hubs for migration and trade within, across, and beyond ostensible imperial boundaries.

David Wheat, associate professor of history at Michigan State University, received his PhD from Vanderbilt University in 2009. His book Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean, 1570-1640 (2016) was awarded the Omohundro Institute's Jamestown Prize, the Lapidus Center's Harriet Tubman Prize, and the American Historical Association's James A. Rawley Prize. His essays have appeared in Clio: Femmes, Genre, Histoire; the American Historical Review; the Journal of African History; Slavery & Abolition, the Journal of Early Modern History, and in several edited collections. He recently co-edited two volumes of essays: The Spanish Caribbean and the Atlantic World in the Long Sixteenth Century, co-edited with Ida Altman (2019), and From the Galleons to the Highlands: Slave Trade Routes in the Spanish Americas, co-edited with Alex Borucki and David Eltis (2020).

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March 23, 2020

Mar 23, 2020: "Voluntary Audits: Experimental Evidence on Monitoring Front-Line Bureaucrats in Argentina" at Stimson Hall

Is it possible to motivate front-line bureaucrats to exert effort in their work without relying on traditional punitive forms of oversight? We examine the motivation and performance of school principals in their administration of a free meal program targeted at school children in an Argentine province. We work with the provincial auditing body to implement an encouragement design in which some principals are offered the opportunity to volunteer for an audit. We expect that volunteering will increase intrinsic and extrinsic motivation as well as school-level outcomes. Preliminary results suggest that the intervention increased principals’ intrinsic motivation with respect to the meal program and increased the likelihood principals report that the opinion of the auditing office is important to them. We find no effect on extrinsic motivation or self-reported hours worked.

Rebecca Weitz-Shapiro is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Brown University. Her research explores sources of variation in the quality of representation, government accountability to citizens, and public opinion in lower and middle-income democracies. Her book, "Curbing Clientelism in Argentina: Politics, Poverty, and Social Policy" was published with Cambridge University Press (2014) and received the Donna Lee Van Cott Award from the Political Institutions Section of the Latin American Studies Association. She has published articles in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, the Journal of Politics in Latin America, and elsewhere. Current projects include a field experiment on bureaucratic oversight in Argentina,
large surveys on citizen oversight of corruption, and a conceptual and empirical project on political knowledge and access to state services.

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